Learning from the Neglected Tropical Disease NGDO Network

By Suzy Campbell,

Over the past few years it has been exciting to see momentum building to address integration and health systems strengthening beyond the traditional vertical approaches of funding and delivery of single disease strategies. A recent supplementary issue of International Health, a journal of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene has a strong focus on health systems strengthening, and should be essential reading for anyone with interest in addressing NTDs.

The supplement has been largely coordinated by the Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) Non-governmental Development Organisations Network (NNN), and is refreshingly dedicated to partnering across the entire sector to continue addressing the challenging issues pertaining to prevention, treatment and management of NTDs.

Intersectoral and transdisciplinary cooperation and learning

Of particular note is the article by Hopkins who describes the new project framework developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region to replace the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC). APOC ceased in 2015 yet has been widely recognised for its contributions towards health systems strengthening, as it has enabled infrastructure development and mobilisation via community health workers, thereby facilitating access to chemotherapeutic drugs by people who have otherwise been truly unable to reach them. The new framework, the Expanded Special Project for Elimination of Neglected Tropical Diseases (ESPEN), will be introduced throughout 2016 and will extend beyond onchocerciasis to coordinate all NTD activities in the African region. Together with the current focus on intersectoral, transdisciplinary cooperation and learning, ESPEN will provide an unprecedented opportunity to drive impetus for integrated health system strengthening activities. This does set a new support structure for integrated NTD control and elimination, and we look forward to its further development with great interest.

NTD morbidity

Much valuable work has been done over the last 15 years to map various NTDs and enable resource prioritisation via chemotherapy. Yet the sheer scale, and varying morbidity, of NTDs means that, in addition to the important prevalence and treatment coverage statistics, it is equally important to capture data on additional morbidity measures. Having sound knowledge of the disease burden from these diseases does facilitate advocacy for their control. There are several articles in the supplement that highlight the importance of capturing data on NTD morbidity, including the importance and measurement of coverage statistics, and a research agenda for the NNN to identify common indicators that can be shared across NTDs.

Integration

Integration, as it is directly influenced by NTD control and elimination strategies, needs to be strengthened with inclusion of structural system enhancements delivered as part of the universal health coverage agenda. For many NTDs, this does require consideration beyond chemotherapy to include “multi-component integration”. However, it is clearly acknowledged that more evidence is required, that it is expensive and logistically challenging, and that it requires strong cross-sectoral collaboration. In the supplement, Waite et al. provide a comprehensive review of the progress that has been achieved in, and opportunities to prioritise, integrating water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) with NTD programmes. Integrated WASH and NTD control contributes simultaneously to several Sustainable Development Goals and every opportunity needs to be taken to further promulgate this.

What’s next?

The international health community does need to determine what a truly integrated universal health coverage agenda should encompass. The NNN has contributed heavily to driving this agenda, as have other organisations. Looking beyond NTDs, this is in direct alignment with macro-political strategies as set by the World Bank, the WHO and other parties. By necessity, a universal health coverage agenda must be broader than NTDs, however NTDs are a major part of this (having been referred to by the WHO as a “litmus test”). As NTD practitioners and researchers we therefore have a major opportunity to collectively share knowledge and in so doing propose critical requirements of integrated health care.

We at COUNTDOWN are delighted to see this supplement published and are wholehearted in our support of its messages.

 

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